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The Friends of Lakewood Public Library is a volunteer organization that has supported the Library with materials, programming and service since 1980. Originally brought together by a determination to keep good books from going into the trash, the group has grown with the Library to become an essential part of Lakewood’s way of life.

Donations of old books, magazines, movies and electronics are welcome every day of the year. While some of these materials make their way into the Library’s collection, most items end up being sold at the Friends’ seasonal book sales. The proceeds are used to sponsor free lectures, concerts and films at the Library and to pay for crucial materials like the Library’s Program Guide and the Library’s van which is used to deliver books to classrooms and those who are unable to leave their homes.

In the last few years, the Friends have begun selling rare books online to increase revenue. Reading material has been donated to armed forces personnel serving in warzones. And libraries devastated by floods and other natural disasters have put themselves back together with help from the Friends.

Support the Friends by donating materials, volunteering, shopping at the next sale or attending a concert.

 

Sunday with the Friends

Nearly every Sunday at 2:00 pm, the Friends of Lakewood Public Library are proud to present
free concerts, lectures and more. Join us in the Main Library Auditorium. These programs are
open to one and all.

November 2                     NEO Dixie
What is the NEO twist in this quintet's traditional Dixieland revue? You'll just have to come listen for yourself. The story begins fifteen years ago at Fort Hood when Corporal Lempener of the U.S. Army asked himself, “Trash or treasure?” while rooting through First Cavalry Band's sheet music library. It took him ten years to find the right musicians with the likeminded curiosity to dive into that dusty old box of Dixieland jazz. Tom Lempner tries to play that shiny Kenny G thingy. Mark Russo plays trumpet…and kills it! No one is sure why, but Kris Morron still likes playing the trombone. Darren Allen is the boss on drums and Cutty Calhoun eats Tuba Flakes for breakfast.

November 9                     Strawberry Sunday       
New in town, this avant garde duo of classically trained musicians from the Cleveland Institute of Music is determined to make a lasting impression. Flutist Kimberly Zaleski and cellist Trevor Kazarian draw their influences from such diverse sources as their respective teachers at the Cleveland Orchestra, Radiohead, the Beatles, Time for Three and Project Trio to create original songs born of alternative rock with improvisatory jazz and classical form. This blending of musical styles, mixed with jamming high energy and beat-boxing swing creates a product that is sweet but also very passionate. Let's say we finish it off with a round of well-deserved applause.

November 16                   ELEGANCE
Soprano Kathleen Bosl is the organizing force behind this outstanding local ensemble, performing classical repertoire by the composers Bizet, Delibes, Faure, Mozart, Copland, Vaughan Williams and Giulio Benedict. Bosl will be accompanied by pianist, Rosalima Valdez Pham on most of the afternoon's selections, and flautist, Rachel Kim will join her on four select pieces. As professionally trained musicians, their influences are, “first and foremost correct, classical technique such as is taught in music conservatories to those desiring to perform the highest grade of music.”
This performance takes place in the First Floor Multipurpose Room.

December 7                     Mike and Mary: Songs of the Season
With Mary rediscovering lovely songs from long forgotten Broadway shows and Mike writing fresh, new arrangements, this likable pair is able to do what they love best and entertain an audience at the same time with their cabaret show. Performing the music of the season with tunes by George and Ira Gershwin, Jule Styne, Rodgers and Hart and more, their show is peppered with stories of the composers, the origins of the music and the artists who originated this art form. <catalog>

December 14                   The Bachelor and the Bobby Soxer (1947)
Here’s some old school Hollywood magic, featuring icons in roles you would never expect. Shirley Temple is a blossoming seventeen year old high schooler who’s decided that she’s in love with a playboy played by Cary Grant. (Okay, that’s not such an unexpected role for him.) The twist is that Shirley’s older sister, Myrna Loy, is a no-nonsense judge who’s not afraid to abuse her power. Grant has bigger fish to fry, but Loy sentences him to woo Temple until she gets over her silly crush. Throwing himself into the teenage scene, Grant gets down with the slang of the day and does the rest of the voodoo that they do, too as he conspires to find an age-appropriate love interest for his lovely nemesis. The resolution to this unlikely affair is as satisfying as it is predictable. <catalog>

January 4                         A Visit with C.S. Lewis
When Kevin Radaker played Henry David Thoreau last year, there wasn’t an empty seat in the house for his thoughtful combination of scholarship and performance. Now Radaker returns to the Library as C.S. Lewis, drawing every word he speaks from the author’s writings in order to share Lewis’ eloquent thoughts on pain and suffering, pride, free will, love, grief, anxiety and prayer. Best known for children’s books like The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe, C.S. Lewis was a distinguished Oxford and Cambridge literary scholar who branched out into imaginative science fiction and fantasy literature for young people, infused with Christian allegory from his own spiritual journey. In 1963, the last year of his life, Lewis will tell the extraordinary story of his conversion to Christianity and recount his career as the most popular and highly acclaimed religious writer of the twentieth century. When the lights come up and the mask is dropped, Radaker, a professor of English at Anderson University, will answer questions from the audience.

January 11                                   Trepanning Trio
Trepanning Trio is an acoustic instrumental ensemble known for making oddly beautiful music with classical, traditional and handmade instruments, including viola da gamba, guzheng and pan lids screwed onto sticks played with violin bows. Contrary to its name, this trio performs with a rotating lineup of six to fourteen members drawn from an unlikely rogues’ gallery of musicians, composers, artists, writers and ethnomusicologists. With a devotion to the complex and pretty, they have shared the stage with free improvisation luminaries like Eugene Chadbourne and Paal Nilssen-Love.

January 18                                   The Hollywood Slim Band
A proud member of the Cleveland blues family, the Hollywood Slim Band has been entertaining crowds with their swing, jazz and blues for nearly forty years and they’re still adding new arrangements to their repertoire. With tender three-part vocal harmonies and decades of playing together, they add their own touch to the music of Howlin’ Wolf, Little Walter Jacobs, Louis Jordan, Ray Charles and The Nat King Cole Trio. A homegrown spirit matched with loving instrumental mastery gives this band a vintage, rockin’ sound, inspired by the founding brothers’ love of Chicago blues and forties-era small combo jazz. .<catalog>

January 25                                   Mike Jacobs: Former Child Actor
Straight out of North Ridgeville, Mike Jacobs has played guitar, bass, drums, theremin and bassoon in groups like Colorado Biosphere, Up All Night Alien Scum, The Jotnar, Tracy Marie Band, and currently Smiley Baldazar, The Brittany Reilly Band and Haight Street Revue. This concert will be his first proper solo effort in twenty years, featuring the debut of a suite of original songs written for the occasion. Jacobs has an unbridled imagination and the skill to match his vision—think Syd Barrett matched with Jimi Hendrix and just the right amount of John Denver. The title comes from former bandmates who used to convince hangers-on that Jacobs had starred in a short-lived Canadian sitcom called The Boy Who Hated Racoons. There's something about him that makes you wish it were true.

February 1                      Duck Soup
It’s been called the funniest of the Marx Brothers films, a mad surrealistic masterpiece and the boldest anti-war statement to ever come out of Hollywood, but Groucho himself characterized it as, “four Jews telling jokes.” Groucho plays Rufus T. Firefly, the president and dictator of the bankrupt republic of Freedonia who declares war on neighboring Sylvania for some quick cash. Chico and Harpo arrive on the scene as enemy spies, Chicolini and Pinky, but soon find themselves becoming trusted members of Firefly’s cabinet—though Chicolini holds onto his day job selling peanuts. Whatever the plot is, it manages to stay well out of the way of the endless parade of puns, one-liners, pratfalls, sight gags, songs, slapstick, court martials and other bits of comedy that make us want to watch this movie again and again. The final battle—wherein the Marx brothers make a mockery of love, war, time and film itself—is a must-see corker! <catalog>

 February 8                      Two Poets: Joe Toner and Dan Rourke
The pounding snow is driving you bananas, and the cold is threatening to snap your bones. So why not slam down a hot chocolate, get to the Library and warm yourself with laughter and poetry? For Joe Toner and Dan Rourke, poetry is the noblest of human endeavors—part vaudeville act, part existential probe into the reasons a grown man might be addicted to peanut butter. Come savor their luxuriant reflections on language and gaze upon the last two people in the world without smart phones. Winner of a 2014 CPAC award, Dan Rourke has performed his poetry for twenty-five years in the Cleveland area. In addition to poetry, he has written essays, song lyrics, a musical and short stories and is currently working on a novel about the life of Fair Hooker. A former high school English teacher, magazine editor, and bookseller, he now works at the Cleveland Foodbank. All of which pales in comparison to the fact that he once wrestled a bear. Joe Toner also taught English at St. Ignatius High School and now teaches at Rocky River High School. As a child, perhaps he delivered your daily newspaper. Since you probably didn’t tip him back then, come and personally thank him by showing up.

February 15                    Jonathan Hooper
Jonathan Hooper is a nice young man with an old soul who we imagine would fit right in at a 1940s New Orleans piano bar. This classically trained vocalist can croon a tune that will transport you back to the golden age of American music, but his true love since age five has always been the piano. After studying in New York with jazz giant Dave Frank, he’s back in his hometown to entertain you with some of his favorite music, combining the solo jazz piano of Bill Evans, Art Tatum and others with the timeless crooning of Frank Sinatra. Who knows, there may even be a few jokes! This performance takes place in the First Floor Multipurpose Room.

February 22                    Ernie Krivda
Perhaps Mike Shanley said it best in the Jazz Times when he wrote, “Ernie possesses an endless flow of melodic ideas that makes everything he plays sound fresh and alive." Now in his fifth decade as a jazz performer, Ernie Krivda is acknowledged by both critics and peers as one of the world's great tenor saxophone players. But as Harvey Pekar wryly pointed out, “no one may know this because he lives in Cleveland.” In demand all over the world, he can only say, “It might be better for my career to live somewhere else but it’s better for my art to live in Cleveland.” An impressive body of recordings backs up that statement—check out our extensive collection of Krivda CDs—but this concert is a chance for Library audiences to experience his performance in person in a cozy little auditorium with no clinking glasses and no amplification—just the sound and the man. Sit back and let him close out our season with a roar. <catalog>




Visit the Events Page for more great

Library programs sponsored by the Friends!

 

 

Friends Book Sales

Friends Holiday Bag of Books Sale
Saturday, December 6
9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Join the Friends and receive entrance to special, members-only preview sales on Thursday December 4 from 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. Memberships may be purchased at the door or with the form below.

Printable Donation Form

 

Donate Via PayPal

Support the Friends and help them help the Library.  All major Credit Cards accepted.

 

 

 

 


The Internal Revenue Service recognizes the Friends of Lakewood Public Library as a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organization.
Donations to the Friends of Lakewood Public Library are tax-deductible to the extent permitted by the law.

Dues are tax-deductible and renewable annually in January.

Join! Click here for a friendly membership form!